London

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Great Russell St, Bloomsbury, London WC1B 3DG, UK

The British Museum is home to one of the greatest collections of artifacts related to human history, art and culture. The British Museum was established in 1753 and largely based on the collections of the physician and scientist Sir Hans Sloane. The museum first opened on Jan. 15, 1759.

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Clive Steps, King Charles, Westminster, London SW1A 2AQ, UK

The Churchill War Rooms located in the underground complex that Prime Minister Winston Churchill to lead the government during World War II. They offer an incredible, one-of-a-kind look at Winston Churchill and England’s approach to World War II.

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17 Gough Square, London EC4A 3DE, UK

Dr. Samuel Johnson wrote the dictionary. Literally. Between 1748 and 1759, Johnson paid a £30 rent, and while living in the house compiled his seminal work, A Dictionary of the English Language, published in 1755 and heralded as “one of the greatest single achievements of scholarship.” Wool merchant Richard Gough built the house during the latter half of the 17th century, and after Johnson moved out, the building was used for a number of purposes. The edifice was damaged during World War II, damage that can still be seen today.

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The Royal Navy light cruiser HMS Belfast was commissioned on Aug. 5, 1939, and built by Harland and Wolff shipyard in its namesake city of Belfast. This is the same company that built another famous ship, the Titanic. The Belfast saw action during some of the most pivotal battles of World War II, including the invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944.

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Abingdon St, London, Westminster SW1P 3JX, United Kingdom

The 14th century Jewel Tower was one part of the royal Palace of Westminster. The edifice was built between 1365 and 1366 to house the personal treasure of Edward III.

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12-13 New Wharf Rd, Kings Cross, London N1 9RT, UK

The London Canal Museum, located in the King’s Cross section of London, tells the often overlooked story of London’s Canals. The museum explores canals from their earliest days as important trade routes to the more leisurely pursuits they are used for today. The museum is housed in a former ice warehouse once used by Carlo Gatti that was built sometime in the mid-19th century to house ice that was imported from Norway by ship and canal barge.

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Covent Garden Piazza, London WC2E 7BB, UK

London’s extensive subway system is famous the world-over. But, the modern system took decades to develop. This museum, located in a former flower shop in Covent Garden, showcases the history of transport from horse-drawn carriages to today’s subway system.

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Buckingham Palace Road, London SW1W 0QH, United Kingdom

The Royal Mews is the home of the stables, carriage house and garage of the British Royal Family. The Royal Mews is in the grounds of Buckingham Palace, to the south of Buckingham Palace Gardens, near Grosvenor Place. George III moved some of his day-to-day horses and carriages to the grounds of Buckingham House in the 1760s.

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21 New Globe Walk, London SE1 9DT, UK

Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre is a replica of the original theater originally built in 1599 and rebuilt in 1614 after it was destroyed by fire a year earlier. Situated on the south bank of the River Thames, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre opened to the public in 1997 and is a great place for watching the plays of William Shakespeare as the playwright intended them to be performed.

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London Bridge, London SE1 9DA, UK
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Wellington Barracks, Birdcage Walk, Westminster, London SW1E 6HQ, UK

The Guards Museum tells the story of the five regiments of Foot Guards namely Grenadier, Coldstream, Scots, Irish and Welsh Guards. Opened in 1988, the museum’s exhibits chronicle the five regiments’ history since the 17th century.

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St Katharine’s & Wapping, London EC3N 4AB, UK
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The Tower of London is a quintessential London landmark. The tower, which dates to 1078, is one of London’s most popular tourist attractions and is home to the Crown Jewels.

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Apsley Way, London W1J 7JZ, UK

Wellington Arch was built between 1826 and 1830 and moved to its present location in 1883-83. The Arch was originally the entrance to Buckingham Palace. It later became a victory arch for Wellington’s defeat of Napoleon. Atop the arch is a sculpture of a “quadriga” or ancient four-horse chariot.

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20 Deans Yd, Westminster, London SW1P 3PA, UK

The Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster, better known as, was built in the 10th century. The coronations of British monarchs have been held at Westminster Abbey since 1066, and the Abbey has been the site of more than 15 royal weddings.

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