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News

ABH: Commandments rule bucked in Barrow

Four months after Barrow County paid $150,000 in legal fees and agreed to take down a Ten Commandments display to end an American Civil Liberties Union-backed lawsuit, other copies of the Judeo-Christian doctrine were hanging in a public part of the same courthouse this week.

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Globetrotting

Nov. 12, 2005: Day 8 in the Old Country

We went to Siena and San Gimignano today — a pair of smaller cities, but both very old. The main church in Siena — known as the Duomo — is absolutely amazing. It’s huge, but they actually planned to increase the size of the church and you can see where they planned on extending the building. San Gimignano is known for its towers. The city is more or less a walled city that dates to

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Globetrotting

Nov. 11, 2005: Day 7 in the Old Country

On a whim, we headed to Pisa today to see none other than the leaning tower. We took a trip on a train — our third thus far and the first on a non-Eurostar train. I thought the trip was a lot of fun. It seemed the leaning tower was by far the city’s biggest attraction. That is, there wasn’t much else to do other than admire an engineering mistake. After spending about 30 minutes

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Globetrotting

Nov. 10, 2005: Day 6 in the Old Country

Thursday brought with it a second train trip and a chance to see one of the world’s most beautiful cities — Venice (or Venezia, as it’s known by locals). Located about three hours away from our base in Florence, Venice is amazing, if for no other reason, because there are no cars in the city. That leaves two choices for seeing the city: travel by foot or hop a boat; Venice is famous for its

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Globetrotting

Nov. 9, 2005: Day 5 in the Old Country

On Wednesday, we got our first taste of Italian art culture with a trip to The Uffizi. We spent some time looking at timeless art pieces created by some of Italy’s best-known artists. The Uffizi is a required attraction for any visitor to Florence, whether or not you are an art aficionado. Built in the latter half of the 16th century to serve as officers for Duke Cosimo I, The Uffizi is the pride of

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Globetrotting

Nov. 8, 2005: Day 4 in the Old Country (Part II)

The first order of business today in Rome was Vatican City, certainly a must-see for anyone visiting Rome.Though I am not Catholic, it is hard not to find the papal residence compelling. After all, Catholicism touches so many people, making Vatican City the spiritual home for millions of people worldwide. I couldn’t help but be amazed by the thousands of people I saw visiting Vatican City — many of whom had obviously traveled great distances

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Globetrotting

Nov. 8, 2005: Day 4 in the Old Country

With Tuesday came the first trip on an Italian railroad — Trenitalia. For me, it was one of the moments I was looking forward to on this trip.Several years ago, I rode on a train in Germany. What strikes me about European train travel, when compared to that in America, is how well-used trains are, The train station in Florence was bustling — trains headed in a bevy of directions. A train pulled into the

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Globetrotting

Nov. 7, 2005: Day 3 in the Old Country (Part II)

“I love your smile,” the waitress told me on the way out the door. The perfect compliment for the perfect evening. So far this trip, dinner at Acqua Al 2 was the best meal we’ve had. The food kept coming, the wine was great and the atmosphere was jovial. To top it all off, the waitress was great, deserving of a 10 Euro tip, perhaps the first tip we’ve left so far. The meals here

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Globetrotting

Nov. 7, 2005: Day 3 in the Old Country

Today (thus far) we visited four churches — all with amazing architecture and great history. We started out at Cenacolo di Ognissanti. The church, which dates to the 13th century, was the parish of the Vespucci family, including Amerigo (America’s namesake). From there, we went to Il Duomo and climbed 470 plus steps (so I’m told) for an amazing view of Florence. The building — both inside and outside — was breathtaking. The first stone