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Early Television Museum showcases history of television

HILLIARD, Ohio — After selling his cable business a little more than a decade ago, Steve McCoy started collecting early television receivers. Years earlier, as a teenager, McCoy worked in a television repair shop, fixing sets from the 1940s. At the time, he wasn’t aware television was even around before World War II. But, that soon changed. “When I started collecting I learned that there was no place the public could see early TV technology,” McCoy

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How do you describe the Grand Canyon?

GRAND CANYON, Ariz. — There really aren’t any words to aptly describe that first glimpse of the Grand Canyon. Massive? Mind-boggling? Grand? All true, yet they just don’t do justice to that first experience of seeing the Grand Canyon. Words simply fail to describe the grandeur and the beauty of this one-of-a-kind natural landmark. Carved by nature over millions of years, the sheer magnitude of the canyon is hard to fathom. It’s one of the

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Small in stature, ‘smallest church’ not lacking in character

SOUTH NEWPORT, Ga. — Christ Chapel in Memorial Park is remarkable not for its size, but because of its small stature. The roadside chapel – referred to as “The Smallest Church in America” – is set on a quiet patch of land along rural U.S. Highway 17, roughly an hour south of Savannah. Overshadowed by Spanish moss hanging from large oak trees rising from the region’s sandy spoil, the church measures an unimposing 10 feet

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Museum shows that death is a celebration of life

HOUSTON — “There is no man that has power over the spirit to retain the spirit; neither has he power in the day of death,” Ecclesiastes 8:8 reads. Death, it’s often been said, is an inextricable part of life. But how cultures grieve their deceased and celebrate lives vary greatly. Nowhere is that more apparent than at the National Museum of Funeral History in Houston. Since 1992, this 35,000-square-foot museum has aimed to educate visitors

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Is the TSA out of control?

ATLANTA — The stories are horrifying, they capture headlines and they spread like wildfire across social media channels. At first blush, it seems like the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), the agency formed in the wake of 9/11 to ensure travelers’ safety, is a rogue government agency. While the TSA has seen a number of embarrassing public mishaps, experts seem to agree: The agency isn’t necessarily a troubled one. It suffers from many of the same

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Chef shows healthy doesn’t have to taste bad

GREENSBORO, Ga. — Even though Chef Eric Fulkerson might be quick to admit he isn’t a doctor, he understands the need for eating healthy. A year ago, he weighed more than 300 pounds. Through better, healthier eating, he’s lost significant weight. Now, he’s bringing his lessons on how to eat well to his diners at Reynolds Plantation, even if that means pulling a fast one over on them. “Healthy is not bad; healthy is needed

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Governor: Lower threshold for a BUI in Georgia

ATLANTA — As thousands plan to take to the water this Fourth of July, Georgia officials are urging caution on the state’s waterways. At the same time, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal wants the state legislature to lower the blood alcohol limit for hunters and boaters to the same level for drivers. The state legislature won’t consider raising the blood alcohol limit for boaters and hunters until at least January, when it next reconvenes.

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Breaking down the ‘Town Too Tough to Die’

TOMBSTONE, Ariz. — It’s hard to describe Tombstone in a single word. “The Town Too Tough to Die” probably lies somewhere between historic re-creation of a southern Arizona mining town and a Hollywood movie that’s come to life on dusty western streets. Shootouts are a daily occurrence. Stage coaches offer visitors tours of the town. Cowboys and lawmen argue in the street while camera-wielding tourists snap pictures from the street’s boardwalks in front of old