Tombstone

535 E Allen St.
Tombstone, AZ 85638
85638

The Bird Cage Theatre was a combination theater, saloon, gambling parlor and brothel that operated from 1881 to 1889 during the height of the silver boom. Stepping into this old theater really is like stepping back in time. When the establishment shuttered in 1889, its doors were sealed until 1934 when new owners opened the building and found a literal window to the back.

(520) 457-3421
,
408 Arizona 80
Tombstone, AZ 85638
85638

Between 1879 and 1884, this was the town cemetery. Its permanent residents include Billy Clanton, Frank McLaury and Tom McLaury, the three men gunned down during the now-infamous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral. By the 1920s, the cemetery was in dire need of restoration. Now restored, the cemetery is one of the city’s main tourist destinations, in part because of its sometimes humorous epitaphs.

(520) 457-3300
,
895 W Monument Rd.
Tombstone, AZ 85638
85638

As Ed Schieffelin started prospecting for valuable minerals in southern Arizona during the latter half of the 1870s, his friends insisted he would only find his tombstone. They were wrong. During its mining history, mines in Tombstone produced $85 million in silver. Schieffelin died in 1897. This 25-foot-tall monument stands near the spot of his original claim

,
326 E Allen St., Tombstone, AZ 85638
85638

The O.K. Corral was a livery and horse corral in Tombstone, Ariz., that operated from 1879 until about 1888. While it is associated with the famous Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, the showdown went down in a lot on Fremont Street. Still, that doesn’t stop hordes of tourists from converging on the OK Corral for reenactments.

(520) 457-3456
,
334 E Allen St., Tombstone, AZ 85638
85638

Silver Strike Winery and Tasting Room almost seems out of place in the rough-and-tumble town of Tombstone, Ariz. The winery is located on Allen Street mere steps from the famous OK Corral. The winery features wines made with Mediterranean grape varietals originating in Italy, France, Germany, Spain and Portugal that are grown at vineyards located 50 miles east and west of Tombstone.

(520) 678-8200
,
11 S. Fifth Street
Tombstone, AZ 85638
85638

Perhaps the most important institution in Tombstone, Arizona, is The Tombstone Epitaph. Founded in 1880, this famous newspaper is today the oldest continuously published newspaper in the Grand Canyon State. In 1881, the newspaper reported on the now-infamous Shootout at the OK Corral and has since been transformed into a monthly journal of western history and museum. While the newspaper office is no longer working newsroom, it is home to a rather interesting museum dedicated to telling the story about newspapers.

(520) 457-2211
,
223 E Doughnut St.
Tombstone, AZ 85638
85638
,

For anyone especially interested in learning the full story of Tombstone, a visit to the Tombstone Courthouse is an absolute must. Built in 1882, this building served administrators of the then-newly created Cochise County until 1929 when the county seat was relocated to Bisbee. At one point, a hotel was planned for the structure, but today the courthouse houses a museum dedicated to telling the historically accurate story of Tombstone.

(520) 457-3311
,